Great book, very easy to read, got done with it within 2 days. The recipes seem easy and the ingredients are reasonably priced, even for organic produce. Haven't actually tasted the recipes yet, will try them this weekend, but the quick hacks have been easy to incorporate, and it's nice that he gives brand names, so it's easy to shop for. The different chapters really make sense regarding their topics ( good "bugs": what they do, and how to help them help you). I also liked the quick list of what you should always buy organic and the list for OK non-organic produce. Looking forward to trying the recipes.
Make fish a regular part of your weekly meal rotation. The Harvard Medical School suggests replacing your saturated fat foods -- steak and bacon -- with more polyunsaturated fats -- salmon and tuna -- to help reduce belly fat. Plus, these healthy fats lower risk of heart disease, which is more prevalent in men than women. A healthy dinner for a flatter belly might include 4 ounces of broiled tuna with 2 cups of roasted Brussels sprouts and 1/2 cup of brown rice for 540 calories.
Hey Cassey. I’ve been doing Pilates for 4 years and now it’s been a year that I teach it. after i found ur website, i started to use ur workout videos in my classes and put them in my own daily workouts. to have a really flat abs is my dream. so it’s been three months, that i’m doing ur bikini blaster and other abs workouts seriously. I’ve lost 3 Kilograms during this time and reaching to my dream is just one more step ahead, which I think it now easily possible with ur new 30 days abs workout . I just want to thank u for every thing u do and wish u the best of the best,
Take off your “fat jacket.” It’s a simple analogy, but helps make the point about the types of exercise that offer the best results for fat reduction and, in turn, a flatter stomach. Think of your body’s layer of fat covering your stomach (and elsewhere) as a “jacket” (one of its purposes, after all, is to hold in body heat). Your exercise goal is to shed that jacket.[7]
"Refined grains like white bread, crackers, and chips, as well as refined sugars in sweetened drinks and desserts increase inflammation in our bodies. Belly fat is associated with inflammation, so eating too many processed foods will hinder your ability to lose belly fat. Natural foods like fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are full of antioxidants, which have anti-inflammatory properties and may therefore actually prevent belly fat.”

Let’s start with a reality check — despite the claims of the fad diets and belly-busting exercises out there, you can’t target fat loss. If you want a flatter stomach, you need to reduce your overall body fat level with a low-calorie, high-nutrition diet and regular calorie-burning exercise. You probably won’t be able to achieve washboard abs in a month, but you can establish new, healthier habits that will benefit your belly and the rest of your body.
Maintaining your weight loss is all about balance, you should try to follow the 80/20 rule. Focus 80 percent of the time on eating healthy, belly-friendly foods that shrink the waistline and fight inflammation. Then 20 percent of the time, you have room to veer off track a bit. This 20 percent is your splurge. You may choose to have one day a week where you have a splurge meal, or you may opt for a small snack twice a week where you don’t exactly make the healthiest choice.
Our muscles are habitual of storing a kind of carbohydrate known as glycogen. This stored carbohydrate is only consumed when our body does some extra exercise. When we get rid of carbs, we can actually access this stored fuel and consume it off. For this avoid consuming carbs after lunch and substitute with low-carb food so that no new fat is stored.
Though it's been months since its debut, the book continually spikes on Amazon's Movers and Shakers list — its roundup of the top-selling products across the site — and it's currently listed as the No. 1 bestseller in the Diet Books category. Naturally, this begs the question: What's all the hype about? Aside from the famous author — and the fact that the title suggests fixing a problem just about every human struggles with (just look at search traffic for "flat belly" and "flat stomach" exercises). Is it all just marketing hype?
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