3) Eat better carbs at better times. Now we’re starting to get a bit more complex. When you are eating carbs, aim for starchy carbs – sweet potatoes, rices, squashes and such. Look for carbs that aren’t processed or liquid. The ingredient list should just be that item (e.g., “sweet potato”, not “cultured wheat starch solids, vinegar, soy lecithin”).
Great book, very easy to read, got done with it within 2 days. The recipes seem easy and the ingredients are reasonably priced, even for organic produce. Haven't actually tasted the recipes yet, will try them this weekend, but the quick hacks have been easy to incorporate, and it's nice that he gives brand names, so it's easy to shop for. The different chapters really make sense regarding their topics ( good "bugs": what they do, and how to help them help you). I also liked the quick list of what you should always buy organic and the list for OK non-organic produce. Looking forward to trying the recipes.
Kneel on the floor with your knees hip-width apart, toes tucked under. Extend your arms out straight in front of your chest, palms facing down. Lift your chest and press your pelvis forward as you hinge backwards, arching slightly through your lower back. Pause and focus on opening up your chest while also keeping your ribcage down and your belly button drawn into your spine. Slowly return to the starting position. That’s one rep. Repeat up to 10 times.
But because you don't have X-ray vision to see whether too much of the potentially dangerous visceral fat is parking itself in your own belly, scientists have figured out a couple of DIY guidelines. To avoid increased risk of obesity-related diseases, women should have a waist measurement no bigger than 35 inches (measure it at the smallest point of your midsection), and some experts recommend a waist-to-hip ratio of around 0.8, meaning that your waistline should be no greater than 80 percent of your hip circumference. According to a Mayo Clinic study released last May, the ratio of waist to hip is believed to be a measurement of visceral fat. Other fascinating research, published in the American Journal of Human Biology, found that women who give birth before age 40 have an average of two centimeters more fat around their bellies than women of the same ages who haven't given birth. (I'll have to thank my two daughters for those extra centimeters.)
HOW TO MAKE IT: Cut up two 4-oz portions of pork into cubes along with 1/2 cup diced onion. Heat a tablespoon of canola oil in a pan over medium-high head. Add pork and onions and saute for 3 minutes. Add a 1 cup of frozen peas and carrots, and 1/4 cup frozen corn. Move veggies to the side, and crack two eggs on the other side, whisking to scramble. Add in 1 cup rice, 1 tbsp soy sauce, a splash of sesame oil if you have it, and fry together for another minute. Makes 2 servings.

Very happy with the results, I incorporated my own food tastes and mixed them with lots of veggies, fruit, kale, spinach and romaine lettuce, a huge salad everyday, no sugar, no white flower, no bread other than 100% wheat a couple times a week, cut out soda entirely. Greek yogurt every day, berries, only sweeten with honey. Old fashioned rolled oats, etc etc. I didn't use any of the recipes, too complicated, and costly too! I have lost 30 lbs from January 5th to now. I didn't exercise the first 2 months wanted to make sure I was losing from the food. I then started walking 2-5 miles 3 times a week - 15 pounds to go to my goal.

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