Beware the Kindle edition unless you can read teensy print. The tables cannot be enlarged enough for me to see. Yes, I can pull them up on my PC but that defeats the purpose of buying it on the Kindle. As for the diet, it is very similar to what I am doing anyway but something changed last year and I gained 15 pounds - all of it on my belly - and cannot get it off. I'm going to see Dr. Randolf this coming week and give his hormone balancing a try. My primary care provider had me on compounded natural Estriol and progesterone for 15 years. At first, the amount was so high that my breasts grew from a C+ to DD in four years (I don't recommend that as a way to enlarge your breasts because I also got suspicious looking cysts that required a biopsy, stretch marks and they are heavy and droopy. My doc prescribed estrogen and progesterone because I had severe insomnia and some hot flashes. I still have insomnia and hot flashes even with the now-lowered dose. So, time to try something different. Will update in a few weeks. BTW I went off both estrogen and progesterone for a few months when I was traveling and the curl came back to my hair. My hair went straight when I went on the pill in 1968. I did not have any estrogen when I was 11 and I was healthy. Maybe I don't need it now.
Cruciferous veggies are one of the healthiest vegetables you can eat, but unfortunately they’re also the ones most likely to cause your tummy to inflate. Thanks to raffinose, a compound that produces extra gas as it breaks down, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and the like can seriously increase your waistline. But don’t ditch them forever. Just save them for meals where you can wear loose pants. Here are other surprising foods that cause gas.
It's an all-too-common problem once you hit thirty: Despite your best efforts, you just can't seem to lose the extra weight around your middle, and you look in the mirror wondering what month and year you lost your waistline. Medical research proves you're not alone—that the average American gains one to two pounds a year after age thirty—usually around the stomach. Not only does this excess belly fat make you look and feel bad, it's the most damaging kind of fat; a precursor to heart attacks and certain types of cancer.
Remember when you ate the rest of the holiday cookies after a big, rich meal, and still felt hungry the next day? That's because prolonged periods of overeating—hello, like the holidays!—make your stomach's network of stretch receptors (the ones that send messages to your brain that you're full) less sensitive. Short-circuit your post-binge appetite by eating healthy portions of low-calorie, high-fiber foods like fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. They'll keep those receptors satisfied without directing you toward the leftover pies.

Dr. Travis Stork is an Emmy®-nominated host of the award-winning talk show The Doctors, and a board-certified emergency medicine physician. He graduated Magna Cum Laude from Duke University as a member of Phi Beta Kappa and earned his M.D. with honors from the University of Virginia, being elected into the prestigious honor society of Alpha Omega Alpha for outstanding academic achievement. Based on his experiences as an ER physician, Dr. Stork is passionate about teaching people simple methods to prevent illness before it happens with the goal of maximizing time spent enjoying life while minimizing time spent as a "patient." Dr. Stork is a New York Times #1 bestselling author of “The Doctor’s Diet,” “The Doctor’s Diet Cookbook,” “The Lean Belly Prescription,” and “The Doctor Is In: A 7-Step Prescription for Optimal Wellness.” An avid outdoorsman, Dr. Stork is a devotee of mountain and road biking, whitewater kayaking and hiking with his loyal dog of nearly seventeen years, Nala.

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