(2016) Not sure this is going to make a difference in one's weight, Stork writes in an easy, conversational tome, much as he sounds on television. The premise is that our bodies need bacteria, and certain foods help the good bacteria thrive. Overall, this is beneficial to one's health. About 130 pages explain what is going on in one's body, why certain foods are beneficial and so on. Then, about 75 pages are diet and recipe information. Not sure this is a lifestyle that will cause weight loss, b ...more


Remember when you ate the rest of the holiday cookies after a big, rich meal, and still felt hungry the next day? That's because prolonged periods of overeating—hello, like the holidays!—make your stomach's network of stretch receptors (the ones that send messages to your brain that you're full) less sensitive. Short-circuit your post-binge appetite by eating healthy portions of low-calorie, high-fiber foods like fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. They'll keep those receptors satisfied without directing you toward the leftover pies.
This happens to me too. It turns out that I have a tight/overstrained hip flexors. My physiotherapist told me that I need to make my hips stronger to be able to bear the stress of the exercise that I put it through. Exercises such as pilates clamshells are one way to do this. Also, using a foam roller to roll out the tight hip muscles really helps.
In this book, we look at all of the ways you can improve your own gut health, starting with the food you eat. My diet recommendations, meal plans, and recipes will help feed and protect your gut microbes. And we look at the many other steps you can take to support your beneficial bacteria, from avoiding unnecessary antibiotics to changing the way you think about dirt and germs. Even the choices you make about how you bring your children into the world can have an impact on your family’s microbiomes.
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